Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Airport, Border and Port Safety and Security
Left Nav Sep
Bioterrorism
Left Nav Sep
Civil Aircraft
Left Nav Sep
Civil Airlines, Airports and Services
Left Nav Sep
Communications and Navigation
Left Nav Sep
Education, Training and Professional Services
Left Nav Sep
Manufacturing and Materials
Left Nav Sep
Military and Defence Facilities
Left Nav Sep
Military Aviation
Left Nav Sep
Military Vehicles
Left Nav Sep
Naval Systems
Left Nav Sep
Personal Equipment
Left Nav Sep
Software and IT Services
Left Nav Sep
Space and Satellite
Left Nav Sep
Weapons, Ammunition and Explosives
Left Nav Sep
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File Logo
New Material Logo
Pro Health Service Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Prosecurity Zone
Web Lec Logo
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Boeing 777 Moving Assembly Line


Strict Standards: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/defensef/public_html/components/com_zone/handleHTML.php on line 623
Boeing
: 08 November, 2006  (New Product)
The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] has started using a moving assembly line for the first time to build its market-leading 777 jetliner. For now, the moving assembly line is used only during final assembly positions for the airplane, moving it at a steady pace of 1.6 inches per minute during production.
Earlier this year, Boeing began work to transform its 777 assembly line into a leaner and more efficient production system. This initial use of a moving line during final assembly represents substantial progress with that transformation effort.

'A moving line is the most powerful tool available to identify and eliminate waste in a production system,' said Elizabeth Lund, director of manufacturing for the 777 Program. 'A moving line drives efficiency throughout the system because it makes problems visible and creates a sense of urgency to fix the root causes of those problems.'

In addition to productivity and quality improvements, Lund stressed the new production system enables greater involvement and support of the people who build the airplanes. Assembly mechanics have been involved with planning and designing the new production system and they will be one of the primary beneficiaries of it.

'We want to make it easier and safer for our employees to do their jobs by providing them the parts and tools they need precisely when they need them,' said Lund. 'It's similar to the team of people supporting a surgeon and ultimately the patient in an operating room.'

To make its 777 assembly line move during final assembly, Boeing uses a tug that attaches around the front Landing gear of the airplane and pulls it forward. The tug has an optical sensor that follows a white line along the floor.

During final assembly, mechanics install items such as seats, overhead stow bins and other items on the interior of the airplane. In addition, functional testing is performed on the various systems in the airplane and the engines are attached.

Boeing intends to complete a continuous, one-bay moving assembly line for the 777, which will include systems installation, final body join and final assembly for the airplane, sometime in 2008. This will be the most extensive moving production line used to build a commercial airplane.

The 777 family of airplanes is the market leader in the 300-to-400-seat segment, consistently capturing more than 60 percent of that market since the airplane was launched. To date, Boeing has sold 851 777 jetliners, with 46 customers around the world that own or operate the efficient and passenger-pleasing twin-aisle airplane.

(photo: Boeing)

Contact Info:

Chuck Cadena

777 Program

Communications

425-294-6105
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 DefenseFile.com
Netgains Logo