Free Newsletter
Register for our Free Newsletters
Newsletter
Zones
Airport, Border and Port Safety and Security
Left Nav Sep
Bioterrorism
Left Nav Sep
Civil Aircraft
Left Nav Sep
Civil Airlines, Airports and Services
Left Nav Sep
Communications and Navigation
Left Nav Sep
Education, Training and Professional Services
Left Nav Sep
Manufacturing and Materials
Left Nav Sep
Military and Defence Facilities
Left Nav Sep
Military Aviation
Left Nav Sep
Military Vehicles
Left Nav Sep
Naval Systems
Left Nav Sep
Personal Equipment
Left Nav Sep
Software and IT Services
Left Nav Sep
Space and Satellite
Left Nav Sep
Weapons, Ammunition and Explosives
Left Nav Sep
View All
Other Carouselweb publications
Carousel Web
Defense File Logo
New Material Logo
Pro Health Service Zone
Pro Manufacturing Zone
Prosecurity Zone
Web Lec Logo
Pro Engineering Zone
 
 
 
News

Successful load testing of 36.5 MW superconductor ship propolsion motor


Strict Standards: Only variables should be passed by reference in /home/defensef/public_html/components/com_zone/handleHTML.php on line 623
Northrop Grumman
: 10 March, 2009  (New Product)
- Most Powerful Motor Ever Tested by U.S. Navy
- Motor Size and Weight Reduced by More Than 50%, Acoustic Signature Reduced, Efficiency Increased
- Superconductor Motors Ready for Deployment
American Superconductor Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation have announced, at the Surface Navy Association's 21st National Symposium, the successful completion of full-power testing of the world's first 36.5 megawatt (49,000 horsepower) high temperature superconductor (HTS) ship propulsion motor at the U.S. Navy's Integrated Power System Land-Based Test Site in Philadelphia. This is the first successful full-power test of an electric propulsion motor sized for a large Navy combatant and, at 36.5 megawatts, doubled the Navy's power rating test record.

This system was designed and built under a contract from the Office of Naval Research to demonstrate the efficacy of HTS motors as the primary propulsion technology for future Navy all-electric ships and submarines. Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) funded and led the successful testing of the motor.

Incorporating coils of HTS wire that are able to carry 150 times the power of similar-sized copper wire, the motor is less than half the size of conventional motors used on the first two DDG-1000 hulls and will reduce ship weight by nearly 200 metric tons. It will help make new ships more fuel-efficient and free up space for additional warfighting capability.

'The successful load test of our HTS motor marks the beginning of a new era in ship propulsion technology,' said Dan McGahn, senior vice president and general manager of AMSC Superconductors. 'This motor provides the U.S. Navy with a truly transformational capability relative to size, stealth, endurance and survivability, providing our Navy with a clear performance advantage for years to come. We are grateful for the steadfast support from the Office of Naval Research, Naval Sea Systems Command and the Naval Surface Warfare Center.'

AMSC and Northrop Grumman shared the work under a formal business agreement, with AMSC serving as the prime contractor for the research and development phase.

'HTS technology offers the Navy a power-dense propulsion solution, and it will save money,' said Donna Potter, director of the Development & Integration business at Northrop Grumman's Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Marine Systems business unit. 'Whether the Navy uses the size and weight savings to make ships lighter and more fuel-efficient, or to pack more capabilities onto fewer ships, the end result is the same: more capability for the warfighter at less cost to the taxpayer.'

Earlier in 2008, the Navy successfully installed another HTS system - an HTS degaussing coil - onboard the USS HIGGINS (DDG 76). Powered by AMSC's HTS wire and magnet cable technology, the coil system will undergo sea trials over the next two years onboard the HIGGINS. Similar to the motor, degaussing coils utilizing HTS wire will significantly reduce system weight for DDG 1000-class ships, landing platform dock (LPD) ships, and for the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS).

The Navy has invested more than $100 million in the development of HTS technology, paving the way not only for use in Navy ships but also in commercial vessels, such as cruise liners and liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers, which can also take advantage of the space and efficiency benefits of HTS motors. To learn more about the advantages of HTS motors, please visit AMSC in Booth #205 at the Surface Navy Association's 21st National Symposium, taking place through January 15, 2009 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Crystal City, Virginia. More information can also be found at http://www.amsc.com/products/motorsgenerators/shipPropulsion.html.

HTS rotating machine technology is also being applied to the renewable energy industry. Wind generator systems utilizing HTS wire instead of copper wire are expected to be much smaller, lighter and more efficient than current systems. This will lower the cost of wind-generated electricity - particularly for offshore wind farms.
Bookmark and Share
 
Home I Editor's Blog I News by Zone I News by Date I News by Category I Special Reports I Directory I Events I Advertise I Submit Your News I About Us I Guides
 
   © 2012 DefenseFile.com
Netgains Logo